Experiential Lessons From Muhammad Ali | The Greatest, Muhammad Ali

When Muhammad Ali was asked what he would like to be remembered for, his words resonates and inspires thus:

What would you like people to think about you when you are gone?

“I’D LIKE FOR THEM TO SAY.
HE TOOK A FEW CUPS OF LOVE.
HE TOOK ONE TABLESPOON OF PATIENCE,
ONE TEASPOON OF GENEROSITY,
ONE PINT OF KINDNESS;
HE TOOK ONE QUART OF LAUGHTER,
ONE PINCH OF CONCERN
AND THEN HE MIXED WILLINGNESS
WITH HAPPINESS.
HE ADDED LOTS OF FAITH,
AND HE STIRRED IT UP WELL.
THEN HE SPREAD IT OVER A SPAN OF
A LIFETIME, AND HE SERVED IT TO
EACH AND EVERY DESERVING
PERSON HE MET.”

Muhammad Ali, the greatest formerly Cassius Marcellus Clay, Jr. born January 17, 1942 and from Louisville Kentucky, won 56 fights out of 61.

And he was known in phases for his revolutionary fighting techniques. Ali was an innovative strategist, introducing new techniques to the art of fighting. His groundbreaking approach had never been seen before.

  • THE ANCHOR PUNCH

    “It was the perfect punch”

    In Ali’s second fight against Sonny Liston in Lewiston, ME, Ali knocked out Liston in the first round with a fast right. The Los Angeles Times reported that it was ‘no phantom punch.’ And Sports Illustrated wrote, “The blow had so much force it lifted Liston’s left foot, upon which most of his weight was resting, well off the canvas.

    ROPE-A-DOPE

    In The Rumble in the Jungle, Ali fought George Foreman in a much-anticipated battle in Zaire, Africa. Foreman was known for his strength, while Ali was known for his speed and agility. However, Ali spent most of the match leaned up against the ropes covering up and allowing Foreman to punch his arms and body. This tactic drained Foreman of his energy with seemingly little impact on Ali. In the 8th round, a tired Foreman once again tried to pin Ali against the ropes. This time, Ali pounced and landed several punches – ultimately knocking down Foreman, winning the match and reclaiming his title.

    THE KING OF TRASH TALK

    “Sonny Liston is great, but he’ll fall in eight!”

    Ali didn’t just win with his fists, he was infamous for taunting and baiting his opponents leading up to the fight and even in the ring with his cunning and clever words. His pre-fight theatrics for the media were very entertaining and would often get into the heads of his opponents, disrupting their mental game. During Rumble in the Jungle with George Foreman, Ali taunted him with “They told me you could punch, George!” According to Foreman: “I thought he was just one more knockout victim until, about the seventh round, I hit him hard to the jaw and he held me and whispered in my ear: ‘That all you got, George?’ I realized that this ain’t what I thought it was.”

    I think Ali’s trash talks prior to his boxing gigs was an avenue to mentally inspire himself that he could always overcome and set his opponents off guard to ponder on his words. This and more confirmed my love for visualisation exercises and words of affirmation to oneself, it helps a long way in achievement of goals.

Besides his boxing career, Ali was a poet known for his coinage of words.

“He who is not courageous enough to take risk will accomplish nothing in life.” Muhammad Ali.

As usual, Ali was confident and colorful before a fight. He told  the interviewer, “If you think the world was surprised when Nixon resigned, wait ’til I whup Foreman’s behind!” He told the press, “I’ve done something new for this fight. I done wrestled with an alligator, I done tussled with a whale; handcuffed lightning, thrown thunder in jail; only last week, I murdered a rock, injured a stone, hospitalized a brick; I’m so mean I make medicine sick.

‘Float like a butterfly, Sting like a bee, your hands can’t hit, what your eyes can’t see.’ – Prior to his fight against Foreman in 1974.

‘It’s lack of faith that makes people afraid of meeting challenges, and I believed in myself.’

‘If you even dream of beating me, you better wake up and apologize.’

‘My way of joking is to tell the truth. That’s the funniest joke in the world.’

Here are highlights of experiential lessons to draw from Ali’s lifestyle.

  1. Ali refused to be inducted into the armed forces, stating that he had no quarrel with them. “My conscience won’t let me go shoot my brother, or some darker people, or some poor hungry people in the mud for big powerful America. And shoot them for what? They never called me nigger, they never lynched me, they didn’t put no dogs on me, they didn’t rob me of my nationality, rape or kill my mother and father…. How can I shoot them poor people? Just take me to jail.” He was systematically denied a boxing license in every state and stripped of his passport. As a result, he did not fight from March 1967 to October 1970—from ages 25 to almost 29—as his case worked its way through the appeals process. In 1971, the U.S. Supreme Court overturned his conviction in a unanimous.here, Ali is clearly a man of virtue who believes in peace and harmony.
  2. Ali then agreed to a third match with Joe Frazier in ManilaThe fight was stopped when Frazier’s trainer, Eddie Futch, refused to allow Frazier to answer the bell for the 15th and final round, despite Frazier’s protests. Frazier’s eyes were both swollen shut. Ali, in his corner, winner by TKO, slumped on his stool, clearly spent.An ailing Ali said afterwards that the fight “was the closest thing to dying that I know”, and, when later asked if he had viewed the fight on videotape, reportedly said, “Why would I want to go back and see Hell?” After the fight he cited Frazier as the greatest fighter of all times next to him.
  3. Here, Ali greatly believed in himself and his abilities, he survived and mounted his challenges, learnt from them and never looked back but forged forward.
  4. Impact of Ali’s stanceAli’s example inspired countless black Americans and others. The New York Times columnist William Rhoden wrote, “Ali’s actions changed my standard of what constituted an athlete’s greatness. Possessing a killer jump shot or the ability to stop on a dime was no longer enough. What were you doing for the liberation of your people? What were you doing to help your country live up to the covenant of its founding principles?”
  5. Interviewer: “Do you have a bodyguard?“
    Muhammad Ali: “No, I have One bodyguard. He has no eyes though He sees. He has no ears though He hears. He remembers everything with the aid of mind and memory. When He wishes to create a thing, He just orders it to be and it comes into existence, but this order does not convey the words which takes the tongue to form like our sound carries ears. He hears the secrets of those on the quite thoughts. He stops those whom, whose that? That’s God Allah. He’s my bodyguard. He’s your bodyguard. He’s the Supreme, The Wise.”  Here he shows his love for God.

THE MAN

Boxing was just one of the amazing facets of Muhammad Ali – the man. His story, told in and outside of the ring, is unparalleled in modern celebrity.

THE LEGEND

Muhammad Ali is responsible for some of the most legendary moments in the ring. His incomparable work ethic, revolutionary techniques, and fearlessness towards standing up for his beliefs, all contribute to the legend that is Muhammad Ali.

THE INFLUENCE

The man who believes real success comes when we rise after we fall.

—President Barack Obama on Muhammad Ali

The Greatest Of All Time

Ali inspires millions worldwide. He gives people hope and proves that anyone can overcome insurmountable odds. He gives people courage. He makes fighters of us all. This is Ali and there will never be another.

Muhammad Ali Died Aged 74: Greatest Boxer of all time passes away with family after a 32-year battle with Parkinson’s disease.

The greatest and the people’s champ would truly be missed greatly. May his soul rest in perfect peace.

 

Info Source: Wikipedia and Muhammadali.com

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